Irish rail strike to hit cross-border services

Irish rail strike to hit cross-border services

'We are pleased with a resolution, which we believe, works for the staff and the company, and we now look forward to working with Southern Rial to restore good industrial relations and deliver the service passengers in the region deserve'.

NBRU General-Secretary Dermot O'Leary said while the talks are "a potential step forward", he added: "It should be borne in mind that the intransigence displayed by Irish Rail management, led it should be said the CEO, together with tacit support from the Department of Transport, will make an overall resolution to this dispute more hard than it might otherwise have been".

"Our trains will be planned to have a second person on board and this has been the arrangement we have operated over the past year".

"The agreement also confirms the terms and conditions under which our members at Southern are employed".

He said money should first be spent on safety, increasing line speed and buying more carriages to improve the service and respond to climate change. "The independent rail regulator has said driver-controlled trains, which have been used in this country for more than 30 years, are safe", the spokesman added.

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Paul Plummer, chief executive of the Rail Delivery Group, representing train operators, said: "This decision leaves the RMT leadership completely isolated". The ordeal of travellers who use Northern and Merseyrail services will be over by tonight, but those unlucky enough to be in the areas covered by South Western, Southern and Greater Anglia will be hit again tomorrow.

Meanwhile, the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) today said that jobs will be lost across London Underground as a result of spending cuts, according to the London Evening Standard.

The row is over the introduction of new suburban trains which the union says are unsafe. Similarly, anti-social behaviour on trains could increase without the presence of a guard.

SWR: The company, which only took over the franchise from South West Trains in August, plans to run two thirds of its regular timetabled 1,700 services.

Since April a year ago, the union and rail provider have been arguing over the role of driver-only trains.

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