New study indicates cheese is good for you

New study indicates cheese is good for you

It found that people who ate small amounts of cheese daily were less likely to have a stroke or develop heart disease than people who abstained or ate it rarely.

The research published in the European Journal of Nutrition linked chowing down on about 40 grams of cheese daily (about the size of a matchbook) with the lowest chances of heart disease and stroke.

To learn more about how long-term cheese consumption affects a person's risk for cardiovascular disease, researchers from China and the Netherlands combined and analyzed data from 15 observational studies including more than 200,000 people. Now, a new saturated fat has fallen under the scrutiny of researchers: cheese. Now, cheese-lovers can sleep well knowing that their midnight snack or post-night-out cheese fry indulgence is actually good for them. While dairy products include good-for-you calcium, protein, and probiotics, they also contain saturated fat, which is associated with high cholesterol.

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Generally, cheese has always been the scourge of every health-conscious person who wants to make sure they have a balanced diet while still loving themselves enough to partake in the simple joy of one of Earth's greatest pleasures. But the benefits outweigh the bad when it comes to cheese. While it may seem like a lot of the dairy product, it's an average of 36 grams per day, which is slightly less than the amount recommended by researchers. "There is some evidence that cheese - as a substitute for milk, for example - may actually have a protective effect on the heart". One portion is 40 grams (1.4 oz), which represents a matchbox-sized chunk, two slim slices or a quarter cup of crumbled cheese, according to The Independent. "But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn't sound unreasonable", Stewart said.

The study did not look at different types of cheeses, and Stewart says more research is needed to know whether certain varieties hold more health benefits (or risks) than others.

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