Murray Edwards defends president Barbara Stocking over Oxfam cover-up allegations

Murray Edwards defends president Barbara Stocking over Oxfam cover-up allegations

The Charity Commission has confirmed it was made aware of the allegations.

Oxfam's country director in Haiti, Roland van Hauwermeiren, 68, admitted using prostitutes at the villa rented for him by the charity and was allowed a "phased and dignified exit" because a high profile sacking would have "potentially serious implications" for the charity, the report said.

Prostitution is illegal in Haiti.

Oxfam aid workers were taking part in "Caligula-style orgies" with prostitutes in the wake of the 2010 natural disaster which devastated the island and left 220,000 dead.

Calling on Oxfam to hand over any evidence of illegal activity by former employees to the police, Ms Patel claimed that charities were "in denial" about abuses perpetrated by workers in the worldwide aid sector. The aid workers were there to provide relief after the 2010 Haiti natural disaster.

Murray Edwards College has defended its president after she was accused of covering up the fact that senior Oxfam staff exploited young women for sex in the wake of the Haiti natural disaster.

Oxfam was also accused of covering up evidence as the Charity Commission said it had never been shown the specific allegations of sexual abuse mentioned in the 2011 investigation report.

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As part of that, we have already asked the charity to review historic safeguarding allegations and its response to them at the time.

Instead, in September 2011, Oxfam announced six staff had left due to misconduct, but this was described as "abuse of power and bullying" rather than the claims revealed in the report. We will expect the charity to provide us with assurance that it has learnt lessons from past incidents and is taking all necessary steps to safeguard all who come into with it'.

Mercy Corps - which handed a job to one of the culprits - said it had received a positive reference from Oxfam in 2015.

The charity said its trustees, the Charity Commission and DFID, as well as other major donors including the EU, WHO and United Nations agencies, were kept informed of the investigation and its outcome.

It said that it had not been able to prove allegations that underage girls were involved.

'The investigation and its outcome were publicly announced and we kept Oxfam Trustees, the Charity Commission and the DFID informed. An unidentified source familiar with the investigation alleged that Oxfam bosses thought it "unnecessary to pursue some of the allegations if we could get enough to simply dismiss the individuals". "The director of country fully assumed responsibility for events that occurred under his management and was allowed to resign on basis that he co-operated and supported investigation", spokesperson added.

It comes amid fresh allegations in The Times that the charity failed to alert other aid agencies about the staff members' behaviour.

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