Lava from Hawaii volcano destroys hundreds more homes

Lava from Hawaii volcano destroys hundreds more homes

On Friday, the count was at 87 homes.

Numerous homes in the upscale gated community of Kapoho Beach Lots were valued at several million dollars each. Hawaii Civil Defense Service officials said they went through the neighborhood to warn residents this was their last chance to evacuate before their final escape route was cut off by lava.

Evans reports the cascade into Kapoho Bay is releasing toxic steam mixed with tiny particles of glass.

They didn't expect the lava flow to head their way. The USGS reported that lava had inundated most of the nearby Kapoho Beach Lots and Vacationland subdivisions.

A slow-moving flood of lava destroyed hundreds of homes in the southeast area of Big Island, turning what had been a scenic bay dotted with beach homes, lush greens and turquoise waters, into a dark slab of steam and lava. Magno described the molten lava as being "like a flood, pouring out, covering everything in its path". "It looks like there's no stopping it".

County Managing Director Wil Okabe said his own vacation home in Kapoho Beach Lots was also threatened by lava. These were vacation homes and rentals, as well as primary residences.

Barbara McDaniel, a retiree who moved with her husband to Vacationland from Washington state five years ago, said they fled as soon as evacuations began, taking little else but their dog and cat with them.

"I left a lot of things behind because I didn't want to feel as if I was abandoning my home", Rahmer said. Kim and Okabe live in Hilo, the county's seat, which is more than an hour drive from the Kapoho area.

Dog found dead on Delta flight
The cause of death is still unknown, and Delta told TMZ it is investigating the case. "There was a stop in Detroit at 6 a.m. The 8-year-old dog was found dead in his carrier last Wednesday at a cargo facility at Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

Some chose to stay in the area, which now has no power, cell reception, landlines or county water, officials said.

People watch from a tour boat as lava flows into the Pacific Ocean in the Kapoho area, east of Pahoa, during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 4, 2018.

Scientists said a laze plume was blowing inland from the ocean entry but dissipating quickly. Any contact with laze plumes can cause serious irritation to the lungs, eyes and skin.

The latest damage came from a large lava flow that crept several miles (km) before severing a key highway junction at Kapoho on Saturday and then obliterating about a half dozen blocks of the subdivision over the weekend, the spokesman said.

"Right now, we don't have anything". She said it would be some time before precise losses were confirmed. "I wish I could just find out if I have a house".

This image from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows shows the lava flow originating from Fissure 8 (not visible in photograph) entering Kapoho Bay on Monday.

There have been various arrests of people forcing their way through blocked areas.

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